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It's Pop Quiz Time Again!

Take this NEW little test to see just how tuned-up you are with the realities of the federal tax structure as laid out by the framers and amenders of the United States Constitution, interpreted by the Supreme Court, and implemented in current law.

 

The Quiz:

 

1. The federal government is strictly limited in its authority to lay taxes, being allowed to unilaterally impose obligations:
a. Only upon, and by apportionment of liability among, the several states;

b. Never upon citizens directly;
c. Neither a. nor b.;
d. Both a. and b., but what do I know? Me, I'm just a lawn-mower-- you can tell me by the way I walk...
 

2. If I grant you the privilege of using my lawnmower commercially, I can charge you a percentage of your gain (that is, I can claim a piece of the action) no matter whose grass you cut.
True

False
What kind of lawnmower do you have?
I thought this quiz was about the income tax...

 

3. I can't claim a "piece of the action" for you cutting grass with YOUR lawnmower except where I have a lawful authority to prohibit you from cutting, and you act only with my permission.
True
False
Maybe
Lawnmowers again!?

 

4. The 16th Amendment is designed to make all lawn-mowing "federal-permission-only", or assign ownership of all lawnmowers to the feds, or both.
True
False
That's the grass-tax amendment?
I live in a condo, and don't cut grass at all...

 

5. A "piece of the action" tax is what is known as an "excise" (privilege tax), and isn't subject to apportionment requirements, but must be uniformly applied (as in, the same rates of tax being applied to the same specified volume or type of taxable activities, regardless of by whom the taxable activities are conducted).
True
False
Cutting grass is good excise!
My tax attorney told me again to STAY AWAY from this site!

 

6. The income tax isn't apportioned, conforms to the uniformity rule, and has been declared many times by the United States Supreme Court to have always been an excise and to have remained entirely unchanged in its legal character by the 16th Amendment.
True
False
Huh?
That can't be true! Think of the implications!

 

7. An excise can be claimed on the taxable activities of:
a. Non-resident aliens
b. American citizens
c. Artificial persons (like corporations and partnerships)
d. All of the above.

 

8. An excise on taxable economic activities measured by the dollars produced in the conduct of the activities can:
a. Apply simply because the "dollars" by which an activity is measured are really "Federal Reserve Notes", whether the activity itself is taxable or not;
b. Be mistaken for a "profits" tax because "a piece of [that kind of] action" can only be taken from the gains; the mere recovery of expenses is not part of the "action";
c. Be assumed to apply only to activities of corporations;
d. All of the above.

 

9. The "income" excise on taxable economic activities can:
a. Amount to any part of what a federal worker earns as such, because all such earnings are realized only by the permission of the government;
b. Be mistaken for a tax on the receipt of gains of any kind because being measured in, and typically paid out of, the dollar-value produced by the activity, the tax appears superficially to be on the dollars themselves (or on simply receiving dollars-- in turn this supports the mistake of thinking that "income" in the tax law has the common meaning of that expression: "all that comes in");
c. Apply to no earnings not realized by permission of the state-- that is, the excise can apply to no earnings realized solely through the exercise of one's right to trade goods and services with others, to receive gifts, to create wealth and do anything else within one's own powers and authority;
d. All of the above.

 

10. The "income" excise can apply:
a. To activity of the same sort as could be done without being subject to the tax (fixing someone's plumbing, for instance), if that activity is done on behalf of the federal government;
b. To activity performed on behalf, or by permission, of the government, no matter where performed or by whom, even when the liable recipient of the gain only performs the activity by proxy, through investment;
c. Both (a) and (b);
d. None of the above.

 

11. The Founders laid down the apportionment rules prohibiting unilateral federal taxes directly on Americans in order to:
a. Impose fiscal restraint on the feds, by confining their unilateral option to a level of burden no greater than could be borne by the poorest state;
b. Ensure fiscal restraint on the feds by making all other revenue-raising options directly dependent on the voluntary participation of individual citizens, who would regulate the size of the federal purse in accordance with the general prosperity by each simply looking after his own affairs (and with the additional benefit of thereby helping to ensure capital formulation at the pace and in the volume most suited to the national circumstances, a balance guaranteed to go wildly askew when the state is not so restrained);

c. Ensure fiscal restraint on the feds by making non-individual-citizen-regulated revenue measures one-time-each affairs, subject to high political accountability and narrowly scrutinized and only reluctantly endorsed by the several states which must bear the pain of raising the tax, and will therefore be active counterweights to the federal state's size, power and ambition (with the predictable and historically-proven effect of keeping both small).
d. All of the above.

 

12. If enough Americans regain the not-so-long-lost accurate understanding of the limited nature of the income tax:
a. The individual prosperity of productive Americans resumes a robust upward climb;
b. The state resumes its intended role of austere night-watchman, adjudicator of disputes, and a few other key, citizen-prioritized activities, having to confine itself to no more than it has the wherewithal to undertake (with the people being always able to infuse revenue into its treasury in the event of crisis or calamity);
c. All the distortions attendant upon substantial political influence over the general economy end, and the astonishing productivity of a free people operating under a real rule of law is unleashed to the benefit of everyone;
d. All of the above.


Score =

SCORING

0 - 24% correct: I'm afraid you've gotten your "education" exclusively from the IRS.

25 - 49% correct: Your heart's in the right place, but you haven't yet started down the path to knowledge.

50 - 74% correct: You're well on the path, but still have some studying to do.

75 - 99% correct: You're on the very verge of self-empowerment...

100% correct: Hello, CtC Warrior!

 

The Answer Key:

 

Question 1: The federal government is strictly limited in its authority to lay taxes, being allowed to unilaterally impose obligations:

a. Only upon, and by apportionment of liability among, the several states;

b. Never upon citizens directly;

c. Neither a. nor b.;

d. Both a. and b., but what do I know? Me, I'm just a lawn-mower-- you can tell me by the way I walk...

Correct response: "Both a. and b.": "No Capitation, or other direct, Tax shall be laid, unless in Proportion to the Census or Enumeration herein before directed to be taken." United States Constitution, Article 1, Sec. 9, Cl. 4


Question 2: If I grant you the privilege of using my lawnmower commercially, I can charge you a percentage of your gain (that is, I can claim a piece of the action) no matter whose grass you cut.

True

False

What kind of lawnmower do you have?

I thought this quiz was about the income tax...

Correct response: "True". I trust no commentary is needed here...


Question 3: I can't claim a "piece of the action" for you cutting grass with YOUR lawnmower except where I have a lawful authority to prohibit you from cutting, and you act only with my permission.

True

False

Maybe

Lawnmowers again!?

Correct response: "True". Again, I trust this need not be supported by argument or evidence...


Question 4: The 16th Amendment is designed to make all lawn-mowing "federal-permission-only", or assign ownership of all lawnmowers to the feds, or both.

True

False

That's the grass-tax amendment?

I live in a condo, and don't cut grass at all...

Correct response: "False". Click here for some relevant observations.


Question 5: A "piece of the action" tax is what is known as an "excise" (privilege tax), and isn't subject to apportionment requirements, but must be uniformly applied (as in, the same rates of tax being applied to the same specified volume or type of taxable activities, regardless of by whom the taxable activities are conducted).

True

False

Cutting grass is good excise!

My tax attorney told me again to STAY AWAY from this site!

Correct response: "True". Click here for some relevant observations.


Question 6: The income tax isn't apportioned, conforms to the uniformity rule, and has been declared many times by the United States Supreme Court to have always been an excise and to have remained entirely unchanged in its legal character by the 16th Amendment.

True

False

Huh?

That can't be true! Think of the implications!

Correct response: "True". Click here for some relevant observations.


Question 7: An excise can be claimed on the taxable activities of:

a. Non-resident aliens

b. American citizens

c. Artificial persons (like corporations and partnerships)

d. All of the above.

Correct response: "d". Click here and here for some relevant observations.


Question 8: An excise on taxable economic activities measured by the dollars produced in the conduct of the activities can:

a. Apply simply because the "dollars" by which an activity is measured are really "Federal Reserve Notes", whether the activity itself is taxable or not;

b. Be mistaken for a "profits" tax because "a piece of [that kind of] action" can only be taken from the gains; the mere recovery of expenses is not part of the "action";

c. Be assumed to apply only to activities of corporations;

d. All of the above.

Correct response: "b". Click here, here and here for some relevant observations.


Question 9: The "income" excise on taxable economic activities can:

a. Amount to any part of what a federal worker earns as such, because all such earnings are realized only by the permission of the government;

b. Be mistaken for a tax on the receipt of gains of any kind because being measured in, and typically paid out of, the dollar-value produced by the activity, the tax appears superficially to be on the dollars themselves (or on simply receiving dollars-- in turn this supports the mistake of thinking that "income" in the tax law has the common meaning of that expression: "all that comes in");

c. Apply to no earnings not realized by permission of the state-- that is, the excise can apply to no earnings realized solely through the exercise of one's right to trade goods and services with others, to receive gifts, to create wealth and do anything else within one's own powers and authority;

d. All of the above.

Correct response: "d". Click here for some relevant observations.


Question 10: The "income" excise can apply:

a. To activity of the same sort as could be done without being subject to the tax (fixing someone's plumbing, for instance), if that activity is done on behalf of the federal government;

b. To activity performed on behalf, or by permission, of the government, no matter where performed or by whom, even when the liable recipient of the gain only performs the activity by proxy, through investment;

c. Both (a) and (b);

d. None of the above.

Correct response: "c". Click here and here for some relevant observations.


Question 11: The Founders laid down the apportionment rules prohibiting unilateral federal taxes directly on Americans in order to:

a. Impose fiscal restraint on the feds, by confining their unilateral option to a level of burden no greater than could be borne by the poorest state;

b. Ensure fiscal restraint on the feds by making all other revenue-raising options directly dependent on the voluntary participation of individual citizens, who would regulate the size of the federal purse in accordance with the general prosperity by each simply looking after his own affairs (and with the additional benefit of thereby helping to ensure capital formulation at the pace and in the volume most suited to the national circumstances, a balance guaranteed to go wildly askew when the state is not so restrained);

c. Ensure fiscal restraint on the feds by making non-individual-citizen-regulated revenue measures one-time-each affairs, subject to high political accountability and narrowly scrutinized and only reluctantly endorsed by the several states which must bear the pain of raising the tax, and will therefore be active counterweights to the federal state's size, power and ambition (with the predictable and historically-proven effect of keeping both small).

d. All of the above.

Correct response: "d". Click here for some relevant observations.


Question 12: If enough Americans regain the not-so-long-lost accurate understanding of the limited nature of the income tax:

a. The individual prosperity of productive Americans resumes a robust upward climb;

b. The state resumes its intended role of austere night-watchman, adjudicator of disputes, and a few other key, citizen-prioritized activities, having to confine itself to no more than it has the wherewithal to undertake (with the people being always able to infuse revenue into its treasury in the event of crisis or calamity);

c. All the distortions attendant upon substantial political influence over the general economy end, and the astonishing productivity of a free people operating under a real rule of law is unleashed to the benefit of everyone;

d. All of the above.

Correct response: "d". Click here and here for some relevant observations.

 

Quiz I

Quiz III

Quiz IV